Ontario Health Reports

Ontario Health Articles, Reports, and Papers

school-2The following articles, reports, and conference papers document how industrial wind turbines harm health if located too close to people. 

 

Adverse health effects of industrial wind turbines, written by Dr. Roy Jeffery, Carmen Krogh, and Brett Horner is published in Canadian Family Physician (May 2013). The article discusses the documented symptoms being presented to family physicians by people exposed to industrial wind turbines.

Risk of Harm to Children, written by Ontario pharmacist, Carmen Krogh, BSCPharm, documents the increased vulnerability of children with autism and respiratory conditions when industrial wind turbines are located in close proximity to family homes and schools. 

Literature Review 2013: Association between Wind Turbine Noise and Human Distress, conducted by Dr. Hazel Lynn, MD, FCFP, MHSc and Dr. Ian Arra, MSc, MD and presented to the Grey-Bruce Board of Health. This study searched 18 peer-reviewed studies to investigate the presence or absence of an association between wind turbine-induced noise and human distress. The Review concluded, "All the studies show there is distress." Read Report 

 

Published in the Bulletin of Science Technology & Society:

 

Wind Turbine Noise

Dr. John P Harrison writes about adverse health effects of turbine noise attributed to the characteristics of turbine noise and deficiencies in noise regulation.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4/256

 

Wind Turbines Make Waves: Why Some Residents Near Wind Turbines Become Ill

Dr. Magda Havas and David Colling write about health symptoms attributed to the pressure (sound) waves that wind turbines generate in the form of noise and infrasound. The article also discusses wind turbines' electromagnetic waves--in the form of poor power quality (dirty electricity) and ground current--and how these can adversely affect those who are electrically hypersensitive.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/5/369

 

Literature Review on Wind Turbines and Health: Are They Enough?

Brett Horner, Dr. Roy Jeffery, and Carmen Krogh explore some of the recent literature reviews on industrial wind turbines and adverse health effects. The article considers the completeness, accuracy, and objectivity of their contents and conclusions.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/5/399

 

Industrial Wind Turbine Development and Loss of Social Justice?

Through a review of literature, personal interviews with, and communications from people reporting adverse health effects, Carmen Krogh documents the loss of social justice reported by people who live near industrial wind turbines. The article discusses the emotional and physical toll of people's symptoms, loss of enjoyment of homes and property, disturbed living conditions, financial loss, and the lack of society's recognition of their situation.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4/321

 

WindVOiCe, a Self-Reporting Survey: Adverse Health Effects, Industrial Wind Turbines, and the Need for Vigilance Monitoring

Written by Carmen Krogh, Lorrie Gillis, Nicholas Kouwen, and Jeffery Aramini, this article provides the results of the WindVOiCe health survey—a survey intended to provide vigilance monitoring for those who wish to report their perceived adverse health effects from industrial wind turbines.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4/334

 

Toward a Case Definition of Adverse Health Effects in the Environs of Industrial Wind Turbines: Facilitating a Clinical Diagnosis

Dr. Robert McMurtry proposes a case definition that identifies the sine qua non diagnostic criteria for a diagnosis of adverse health effects in the environs of industrial wind turbines. He discusses the need to create a common definition to establish a clinical diagnosis and facilitate future research efforts.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4/316

 

Occupational Health and Industrial Wind Turbines: A Case Study

This case study written by Robert Rand, Stephen Ambrose, and Carmen Krogh serves to raise awareness about the potential for adverse health effects among occupational workers exposed to industrial wind turbines.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/5/359

 

Public Health Ethics, Legitimacy, and the Challenges of Industrial Wind Turbines: The Case of Ontario, Canada

Martin Shain reviews the public health ethics justifications for the licensing and installation of IWTs. He concludes that the current methods used by governments to evaluate licensing applications for IWTs do not meet most public health ethical criteria and are contrary to widely-held fundamental principles of administrative law and governmental legitimacy.

http://bst.sagepub.com/content/31/4/346

 

Presented at Inter-noise 2012 in New York City, USA.

 

Wind turbines can harm humans: a case study

Presented by Carmen Krogh, Dr. Roy Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner. This talk presents evidence including peer-reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents, and expert testimony which supports the conclusion that wind turbines, if placed too close to residents, can harm human health.

 

Wind turbine noise perception, pathways, and effects: a case study

Presented by Carmen Krogh, Dr. Roy Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner. This talk presents evidence including peer reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents and expert testimony which supports the conclusion that noise perception via the indirect pathway can result in serious negative effects.

 

Annoyance can represent serious degradation of health: wind turbine noise, a case study

Presented by Carmen Krogh, Dr. Roy Jeffery, Jeff Aramini, and Brett Horner. This talk presents evidence including peer reviewed literature, case reports, freedom of information documents and expert testimony which supports the conclusion that annoyance can represent a serious degradation of health.

 


 

University of Waterloo report: Wind Turbine Noise, Sleep Quality and Symptoms of Inner Ear Problems